What are we doing about it?

> Learn more about our Black Cockatoo Work

There are two subspecies of Forest Black Cockatoo in our region.

Red-tailed Black-Cockatoocockatoo pair

Scientific Name: Calyptorhynchus banksii naso

Conservation Status: Endangered

Body Length: 55-60 cm

Distribution: Jarrah/marri/karri forests of south-west Western Australia

Habitat: Forests

Distinguishing feature: Striking red and orange feathers on the underside of tail

The Red-Tailed Black cockatoo is an iconic large bird species of the Blackwood Catchment. With a melodic call, the species is synonymous with the forests that cover the south-west corner of WA.

> Listen to the call of the Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo

The Forest Red-tailed Black Cockatoo once occurred between Albany, Augusta and Perth and north along the Swan Coastal Plain to Dandaragan. The current distribution is confined from just north of Perth south to Frankland and Albany, covering the corner across to the western coast.

While the Red-tailed Black Cockatoo feeds on the seeds of other species, around 90% of its diet is made up of the seeds from Marri (Corymbia calophylla) and Jarrah
(Eucalyptus marginate) fruits.

The Red-tailed Black Cockatoo was once common in the south-west forests of Western Australia, but began declining as a result of timber harvesting and clearing for agriculture in the early 1900s. This cockatoo has now declined in range by up to 45%.

In WA, the Red-tailed Black Cockatoo is listed as Vulnerable under the Commonwealth EPBC Act 1999, and rare or likely to become extinct under the Western Australian Wildlife Conservation Act 1950. The Red-tailed Black Cockatoo fits the IUCN (2001) Red List Categories and Criteria for Vulnerable.

Carnaby's Cockatoo

Baudin’s Cockatoo

Scientific Name: Calyptorhynchus baudinii

Conservation Status: Endangered

Body Length: 52-57 cm

Distribution: Jarrah/marri/karri forests of south-west Western Australia

Habitat: Forests

Distinguishing feature: White feathers patch on the side of their head

> Listen to the call of Baudin’s Cockatoo

Sometimes confused with the Carnaby’s cockatoo, Baudins Cockatoo is the specialist of the cockatoos with a beak designed to feed on their favourite food- honkeynuts (eucalyptus nuts). With skill and precision, the Baudins cockatoo has no problem picking the seeds out of these oddly shaped nuts.

A large black cockatoo endemic to a 2,000 km2 area of the south-west WA, the distribution of Baudins has declined over more than 50% of its range over the past 50 years. The principal cause of the decline in range was clearing of the eastern margins of the forests for agriculture.

Baudin’s Cockatoo is currently listed as Endangered in Western Australia. It is listed as Vulnerable under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

Major threats to these species are:
  • Habitat loss
  • Nest hollow shortage
  • Competition for available next hollows
  • Illegal shooting
  • Climate change
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